A.764. "Alyssa's Law"; requires public school buildings to be equipped with panic alarm linked to local law enforcement.**

New Jersey Assembly
Last action 6 months ago
Polls (open):

Summary

                    This bill requires that all public elementary and secondary schools be equipped with a panic alarm for use in a school security emergency including, but not limited to, a non-fire evacuation, lockdown, or active shooter situation.  The panic alarm, which will not be audible within the school building, must be directly linked to law enforcement authorities and must immediately transmit a signal or message to the authorities upon activation.  The bill defines “panic alarm” as a silent security system signal generated by the manual activation of a device intended to signal a life-threatening or emergency situation that requires a response from law enforcement.
                
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                          The bill also requires that all public elementary and secondary schools be equipped with a red emergency light that is affixed to the exterior of the school building in a highly visible location above or near the front entrance visible from the nearest public roadway or, if the school building is not visible from the nearest public roadway, then on that roadway.  The bill requires that the emergency light be linked to the school’s panic alarm so that it turns on when the panic alarm is activated.

      The bill directs that the proceeds of bonds authorized to be issued to fund the State share of the costs of Schools Development Authority district school facilities projects or the State share of the costs of school facilities projects in all other districts, including county vocational school districts, be used to fund the full cost of the panic alarms and emergency lights.

ASSEMBLY EDUCATION COMMITTEE: The Assembly Education Committee reports favorably Assembly Bill No. 764 with committee amendments.

      As amended, this bill, entitled “Alyssa’s Law,” requires that all public elementary and secondary schools be equipped with a panic alarm for use in a school security emergency including, but not limited to, a non-fire evacuation, lockdown, or active shooter situation.  The panic alarm, which will not be audible within the school building, must be directly linked to law enforcement authorities and must immediately transmit a signal or message to the authorities upon activation.  The bill defines “panic alarm” as a silent security system signal generated by the manual activation of a device intended to signal a life-threatening or emergency situation that requires a response from law enforcement.

      The bill also requires that all public elementary and secondary schools be equipped with a red emergency light that is affixed to the exterior of the school building in a highly visible location above or near the front entrance visible from the nearest public roadway or, if the school building is not visible from the nearest public roadway, then on that roadway.  The bill requires that the emergency light be linked to the school’s panic alarm so that it turns on when the panic alarm is activated.

      The bill directs that the proceeds of bonds authorized to be issued to fund the State share of the costs of Schools Development Authority district school facilities projects or the State share of the costs of school facilities projects in all other districts, including county vocational school districts, be used to fund the full cost of the panic alarms and emergency lights.

      This bill, “Alyssa’s Law,” is named in honor of Alyssa Alhadeff, a 14-year old student, who was killed on February 14, 2018 at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland, Florida.  Until a few years ago, Alyssa and her family were residents of Woodcliff Lake, New Jersey.  It is the committee’s hope that the school security measures required under this bill will help to prevent future school tragedies and the senseless loss of life that has accompanied these tragedies.

      This bill was pre-filed for introduction in the 2018-2019 session pending technical review.  As reported, the bill includes the changes required by technical review, which has been performed.
                

In an effort to be an unbiased source of information, all text in this summary comes directly from government resources.

Actions

  • Passed Assembly (Passed Both Houses) (76-0-0)

    Mon, Jun 25th 2018
  • Received in the Assembly, 2nd Reading on Concurrence

    Thu, Jun 21st 2018
  • Passed Senate (38-1)

    Thu, Jun 21st 2018
  • Substituted for S365 (2R)

    Thu, Jun 21st 2018
  • Reported out of Senate Committee with Amendments, 2nd Reading

    Mon, Jun 11th 2018
  • Reported out of Senate Committee with Amendments, 2nd Reading

    Mon, May 14th 2018
  • Referred to Senate Budget and Appropriations Committee

    Mon, May 14th 2018
  • Received in the Senate, Referred to Senate Education Committee

    Thu, Apr 12th 2018
  • Passed Assembly (66-6-1)

    Thu, Apr 12th 2018
  • Reported out of Assembly Committee, 2nd Reading

    Thu, Apr 5th 2018
  • Reported out of Assembly Committee with Amendments and Referred to Assembly Appropriations Committee

    Mon, Mar 12th 2018
  • Introduced in the Assembly, Referred to Assembly Education Committee

    Tue, Jan 9th 2018